When is an event surprising enough that I should be confused?

Today, I was reading Mistakes with Conservation of Expected Evidence. For some reason, I was under the impression that the post was written by Rohin Shah; but it turns out it was written by Abram Demski.

In retrospect, I should have been surprised that “Rohin” kept talking about what Eliezer says in the Sequences. I wouldn’t have guessed that Rohin was that “culturally rationalist” or that he would be that interested in what Eliezer said in the sequences. And indeed, I was updating that Rohin was more of a rationalist, with more rationalist interests, than I had thought. If I had been more surprised, I could have noticed my surprise / confusion, and made a better prediction.

But on the other hand, was my surprise so extreme that it should have triggered an error message (confusion), instead of merely an update? Maybe this was just fine reasoning after all?

From a Bayesian perspective, I should have observed this evidence, and increased my credence in both Rohin being more rationalist-y than I thought, and also in the hypothesis that this wasn’t written by Rohin. But practically, I would have needed to generate the second hypothesis, and I don’t think that I had strong enough reason to.

I feel like there’s a semi-interesting epistemic puzzle here. What’s the threshold for a surprising enough observation that you should be confused (much less notice your confusion)?

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